Nutritional Endocrinology Practitioner Training

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Summary

The Nutritional Endocrinology Practitioner Certification provides the training and mentorship needed for a practitioner to feel confident as a practitioner who knows how to get results that lead to healthy and happy clients.

The training provides training in functional nutrition, functional assessment, nutrigenomics, and strategies for balancing all the body systems and the hormones that control them using nutrition and lifestyle approaches.

The curriculum includes in-depth training modules plus case analysis and coaching calls leading to Certification as a Nutritional Endocrinology Practitioner.

Transcript
Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Welcome back folks. I know you’ve been enjoying this event a lot and you’re going to enjoy this as much as anything. Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN Loscalzo, she’s the founder of the Institute of Nutritional Endocrinology. She’s going to tell us all about that. And she has a course. It’s going to blow you away. Matter of fact, if I wasn’t so busy teaching the course, this is the course that I would be taking. She is, I’m telling you Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN, you know, I’ve known you for a long time, and I’m so glad you’re here. And I just want to tell the folks a little bit about your background and then you can tell them what I left out. Okay. So, she’s passionately committed to transforming our current broken disease care system into a true healthcare system where each and every practitioner is skilled at finding the root causes of their health challenges. 

Now that’s, you know, you know what we need to do is change the world here and Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN’s right up at the top of the people doing that by her training program. She specializes in using the wisdom of nature to restore balance, to hormones, with a special emphasis on thyroid, adrenal and insulin, which is amazing. Her practitioner certification program empowers health and wellness professionals to unravel the mystery of their client’s complex health challenges. So, they can get to the root causes of health issues by using functional assessments and natural therapeutics to balance the endocrine system, which is the master controller as you know. Now, just a couple more things, Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN is a licensed doctor of chiropractic. 

She’s got very special, extra certifications in acupuncture, in nutrition, in herbal medicine and heart math. And she’s also a certified living foods, chef instructor, and coach, and she’s trained and certified hundreds of others in the art of using pallet pleasing whole fresh food as medicine. I think that means that it tastes good and it she’s the best selling author, speaker and internationally recognized nutrition of women’s health authority. And with over 28 years of clinical experience, Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN offers online courses, long distance coaching and counseling and transformational live events. I want to tell you all the people have had on so far, I, one that I personally know is changing lives and changing the world is Dr. Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN. So, thank you so much for being here. And I got some questions for you, but thanks for being here. 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Thank you for having me, Reed, and for that wonderful intro and with so much enthusiasm and gusto. And I know that you and I are aligned with our, let’s just say our opinion of our current Western medical system and how we can see the future changing and how we’re a part of it. And you’re a huge part of it as well. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Well, I want the folks to know, cause we have, you know, tens of thousands of health coaches potentially watching this. And I want them to know that when I, you know, I teach a program too, you know, and when I reached out to the other people who teach programs, you know, not in a competitive sense, but just like, look, let’s just get together. Let’s cooperate, let’s build this up because we know we need to change the world, you’re the first one that signed up, you know, and I knew you would, I need to be right there, saying right on, Reed. Let’s do it. And so, thank you again for that. And you know, you also have a very specialized approach to this thing. So, talk about a nutritional endocrinology and your background. Give us a little bit more about why you decided to do this and where you came from. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Yeah. So, I came to it like a lot of folks from a place of being ill myself and going through that Western medicine process, if you will of here’s, oh, here’s a diagnosis, here’s a drug to do the diagnosis. Oh, that didn’t work. Oh, here’s another diagnosis. And here’s another thing to take care of that. And it wasn’t working for me. I turned my health around as I started to explore nutrition, and the role of hormones, and adrenal fatigue, and thyroid issues and all this. And I put together a program for myself and got myself well. And I thought that was hard. That was hard. I just spent years using my clinical diagnosis, my nonclinical diagnosis skills, but my computer diagnosis skills, because that’s what I came from, to learn a new hardware software and then try to fix it on me. And I thought, it has to be easier for other people. And that’s when I decided to change my career. And I left my very lucrative job in the computer business back in the eighties when computer jobs were very lucrative. And I started to do. And so as I… 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

I was going to say, you started back when, when I couldn’t even spell IBM. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

I started back when we didn’t have computers like this, we had these things called punch cards and they were a little longer than this. And you programmed every step of the computer on these cards. And then you had a stack of them. And then God forbid, you ran into somebody on the way to the computer room 

and knocked over the deck. You had to start over because it got out of order. And then you put them into the computer to tell it what to do. You’d wait two or three days and you get this printout of whatever, and then you’d go oops, you made a mistake. Do this over again. That’s when I learned computers. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

It’s remarkable. And they were as big as a house, you know. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Oh, bigger. yeah. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yeah, yeah. Amazing and you had to have the air conditioned rooms and all that stuff. Now you have it all on a cell phone. A cell phone has more power. Yeah, yeah, exactly. It’s all right there. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Then an IBM 360 machine back in the day. Yep. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

I’ve told this story many times that I built my nutrition practice. One of the busiest in the country, back at the turn of the century with nothing but a pager and a fax machine, you know, that was the extent of my technical ability. Well now here we get to talk to each other, you know, face to face from, you know, hundreds of miles away and then share that with people all over the planet, just by a click of a button, it’s remarkable you know. But one thing you and I have in, in our backgrounds is like a lot of traditional wisdom. I even mentioned in your, you know, your bio that like it’s about wisdom and you don’t always get that from a computer. So, talk about how you got into the nutritional endocrinology, how that happened and what is it? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

What is it? So, let’s start with what it is. So, endocrinology is the study of the hormones in the body. And most people, when you say endocrinology, they’re thinking, an endocrinologist, you go there for a thyroid problem or you go there for diabetes, or you go there when, you know, you’re having trouble with your hormones, your female hormones or something. And really hormones control everything in the body. And there’s hundreds of them. There’s not just estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, and thyroid, and insulin. There’s way more than that. And they control everything, our thoughts, the heart, the detox systems, everything. And so, when you know how to manipulate, you know, and I don’t say that badly, manipulate being everybody has choices every day, every moment, when you learn how to make choices, that keep those hormones in balance, that’s when you have mastery. And that’s what I think every practitioner needs to know. And also every body, every person that’s looking for health needs to understand that, to an extent how their choices affect their hormones. So, that’s what nutritional endocrinology is, is how nutrition, and I use the word loosely nutrition, because nutrition is not just the food we eat, but it’s the thoughts we hear, you know, what we listen to, what we put on and in our body. I think of that as nutrition. Cause that’s how we either nourish the body or anti-nourish the body. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

That’s beautiful, you know, and I know what you mean about the expansion on nutrition. Cause I had to call, you know, my program, something, we came up with functional diagnostic nutrition, but it’s really nurturing. It’s not just the food you eat, which is important. I mean we’re made of food, so it better be some good ingredients. We’re made of food. But it’s nurturing of the soul, the spirit, the mind, you know, the entire body and everything. So, I completely get, so it’s nutritional or nurturing of endocrinology. And yeah, those messengers that go to every cell. I mean every cell is regulated by hormones to some extent, right. I know every cell in the body has a thyroid receptor, for instance 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

That’s right. Every cell has insulin receptors, thyroid receptors. And some, some receptors are specific when we talk receptors just for people who aren’t that savvy on that, is there’s one thing to make a hormone, which is like this little messenger, this little nail that goes through the body. It has to land somewhere and give a message to that organ, gland, tissue to do something. So, it’s really a message to say, here’s what you need to do next. So, thyroid’s on every, on every cell because thyroid controls metabolic rate and how we utilize oxygen to create energy. And so, we need that on every cell in the body. Now, some, some things may not be on every cell in the body. Maybe we don’t need testosterone receptors on every cell, but we need them on more than just the testes, right. So, there’s a lot of other places with them, but there’s some hormones that don’t actually affect every cell, they’re specialized. And then there’s other hormones that are universal, that are on all the cells. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

And so, how does that contribute or inhibit, I guess, health and disease. What part does it play? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

This is big. So, the hormones are the messengers, right. They have to be received. And most traditional medical kind of approaches to hormone balance is measure the blood, is there enough of this hormone? Great. If there’s not enough, let’s give more, but they’re not looking at resistance. The receptors that get resistant. We do look at that, to be fair, in insulin resistance, right. Diabetes, and metabolic syndrome, and insulin resistance, and what I call pre-insulin resistance as well. It’s not diagnosable, but it’s still happening. And that affects how well the cells will pick up the glucose from the bloodstream. And there could be plenty of glucose, but not enough, and plenty of insulin, and not enough gets into the cells. We’re exhausted, but we have high sugar because the cells are going, nope, too much. 

I’ve got enough of that. Cause all the hormones in excess cause damage and the body is thinking about that. It’s like, I don’t want to let too much insulin into this, so it might stiffen the artery or it might do, right. So, the cells are wise. Plus some of the excesses can cause damage to the cells. So, every single one, thyroid resistance, it’s one of the most overlooked issues that I ever see. Oh, you’re fine, ma’am, you’ve got hair falling out, and your skin is dry, and you’re constipated, and you’re depressed, and you’ve read on the internet. You just read too much lady that, that it might be thyroid, but I tested your thyroid and your TSH is fine. So, you don’t have a thyroid problem. You know? And then we educate people like, well, TSH, isn’t the only thing we have to look at T3 and T4 and the antibodies. And so some of the docs are actually looking at all that and they come out fine. And they’re saying, you’re fine ma’am, no worries. Here’s some laxatives. Here’s some antidepressants. Here’s some, you know, skin stuff and the person’s not getting well. When in reality, such a big deal is with the thyroid resistance and it’s not measurable, but it’s present. And so many of our day to day activities and things, we do wrong, right. 

The crap we eat, the stress have affects those receptors. So, I always tell people, yeah, if you have measurable other things going on in the blood, a thyroid conversion issue or an antibody issue, or whatever. Yeah, we have to address that, but everybody should be addressing the resistance because you may get all of that stuff in balance and still have the symptoms. So, we have to look at what’s going to affect those, those receptors and get them healthy. That’s not just true of thyroid. That’s not just true of insulin. That’s true of estrogen, progesterone, testosterone. And the more we have doctors that are testing those levels in the blood and then giving those hormones without looking at root cause, the more resistance we’re getting because excess of those hormones in the cell is dangerous and the body’s protecting itself. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yeah, now, I’d like to talk, oh God, I could ask you about where’s that resistance coming from. But I think we should establish first that what you’re saying, and this is so true, you know, that the AMA, you know, your standard physician can look at something and say, well, nothing’s wrong with you. You know, you look, I mean, who hasn’t been to the doctor who felt crappy or, you know, someone who has, and then they were told, oh, your blood work looks normal. You know. So, what does that mean? Your symptoms in your head, your tiredness and your fatigue, and you feel lousy, blue, sad, you know, you got foggy thinking, but none of that shows up on a standard chem panel, you know. So, but they’re not crazy. There is something going on and that’s where this idea of, you know, functional and getting deeper and looking at the root cause has come from. So, you can be told by a physician nothing’s wrong with you. And there’s a ton going on really, right. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Right. And when you said, I just want to go back to what you said about the function, the chemistry that they look at when you don’t know how to read the chemistry, you don’t see that. But when you look at it from a lens of comparing things and looking at levels of this versus levels of that, and looking at well, T3 

is, T4 and T3 are fine, but T4 is way higher within your quote unquote normal range, then T3 is, so is there an issue there? But also the ranges that they’re looking at, most of them are based on a 95 percentile thing. So, all of us fall into the 95 percentile and you’re only abnormal if you’re out of that. And when you look around and you look at, are we comparing it to a healthy population? Is a normal average population healthy? Where half the people are going to get cancer in their lifetimes. And people are dropping dead of heart attacks that don’t even know they have heart problems. This is not a healthy society. And I always tell my patients and my student practitioners, I say, do you want to be average? Or do you want to be healthy? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

And so, we have to look at more optimal ranges and we have to look at all the different things that play in. And one example, I’m just going to throw this out here, because it’s a pet peeve of mine. People will look at, doctors used to look at serum iron and say you’re anemic or not anemic. They weren’t looking at ferritin. And they weren’t looking at the storage of the iron. And then you can detect that there’s an iron deficiency before the serum level gets low. If the storage form is low. Okay. So, some people said, forget iron. Let’s just look at ferritin. They’re throwing the the boat away. Right. How do we look at, you have to look at both because yes, in an iron deficiency, iron and ferritin are low. In an iron excess, leading towards possible hemochromatosis or some other, you know, things like that. Boom, both of them are going to be high. But what does it mean if iron is high and ferritin is low? 

What does it mean if iron is low and ferritin is high? Nobody’s talking about it. So, I started to dig when I started to see this over, and over, and over, again into various mechanisms. Why isn’t the iron getting stored into ferritin when it’s excessive in the blood? Or why isn’t the ferritin being pulled into the blood as serum iron, when the serum level gets below a certain threshold? What’s going on there? And so, that’s what I mean by functional assessments, like looking, and that’s what I teach in my program is I want you to learn how to think, not, how to apply a protocol. I want you to learn how to think this pathway and this pathway, and I don’t know, and dig and be able to find the research that supports or the biochemistry textbooks that show you the pathways and go. I discovered with somebody who had a very high iron and a very low ferritin, and I started digging, melatonin’s involved in that conversion of the iron, from the blood. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Another hormone. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Another hormone, right. And so, she went, oh, I just got my BioHealth, whatever panel done in my melatonin was low. And I went great. Let’s work on your melatonin. Let’s look at why is your melatonin low? Cause just taking melatonin. Is it precursors? Is it B vitamins? Is it amino acids? Does that mean it’s stomach acid? Well, how the heck did you get from iron and ferritin to stomach acid? Because we know how the body works and we go backwards through what are all the mechanisms that can be causing it. So, yeah, put her on melatonin. Of course she wanted to get results quickly and she was having trouble sleeping. But we also wanted to look at what was before that, in the process. That’s what I love teaching. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

And you’re a great teacher, you know, you make it such so exciting and you bring out the nerd in me. I love, you know, you just want to get, dig, dig deeper and deeper. Sometimes I spend just hours doing research because it’s not like I don’t have other stuff to do, but it’s so interesting. It’s actually entertaining, you know, to be learning all this stuff and it goes in there. But what you said is beautiful because when, so if anyone hears from their physician and remember, this is someone who has a complaint that, you know, they don’t feel right. They don’t look right, something about the way they look or feel, that they know is wrong. If you get told by a physician that there’s nothing to see here, go see someone else because they can look at those relationships and the, you know, the whole picture, not just, there’s nothing out of range here, you know, because nothing out of range doesn’t mean there’s nothing wrong. 

And that’s really, really important. And also, you know, functional practitioners run different labs. They’ll look at saliva, they’ll look at urine, they’ll look at, it’s not just what’s in the blood floating around, you know. And now, let’s talk about this, because the opposite could also happen. You could go to a physician and you could give him now, listen, we’re not picking on physicians, because they do wonderful work and have a great place. And we need to be able to integrate with them when someone needs a physician. But if you have been turned away or if you’ve been, you know, kind of told, well, your problem sounds like this. Like, so there are what are called traditionally reliable clusters of symptoms. 

So, I could go through a cluster of symptoms and you would say, well, Reed, that sounds like thyroid. You know, they’re tired, fatigued, and sad, and blue and they got weight they can’t get rid of, their hair might be thinning, they have cold or numb extremities, they have constipation for sure. And a couple other things thrown in and it sounds like thyroid. So, then, you know, the physician would probably, sounds like thyroid, let me run a thyroid test. And let’s say they run it, and they do find that TSH is, you know, high and a couple of hormones their T3, T4, whatever are low. And then they go a-ha, I found your problem. 

That’s almost as bad as saying there’s nothing wrong with you, because then they go and here’s the solution. They’re going to write the prescription for the T3, T4 Maybe they’ll get that right. And have you come back awhile and they’ll titrate it and they’ll say, well, look at that. The paper’s perfect. And yet you, the person could say, well, my paper’s perfect, but I feel like crap still, you know. And why is my thyroid low? And what can I do about it? I’m willing to take responsibility and behave differently. And it’s just not how things work in contemporary medicine. The Western medicine. So, let’s talk about that when you know, it’s not a misdiagnosis, because you know, the doctor thinks he’s doing a good job in saying, I found your problem and here’s the answer. Leaving you with, like what? Maybe even if your symptoms go away a little bit, they may come back or new ones will appear, let’s say…. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Because you didn’t address the root cause. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Right. So, talk about that. Like, how do we, if someone has low thyroid, you might give them something to, you know, like ease the pain a little bit, like there’s nothing wrong with relief care, but you can’t end there. Right? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

You can’t end there. Exactly. So, I call it the bandaid care versus the root cause. And yeah, sometimes we’re going to give you a bandaid to help you function while we’re looking for the root cause. But we can’t just do that. I always give the example of women with hot flashes. Cause in the people that we see a lot of, it’s women in that age group and they’ll say, oh, you have hot flashes. Oh it’s your age. Oh yeah. Look, your progesterone’s low. Your estrogen’s low. Here’s some hormones. And that gets rid of the hot flashes, but why do they have hot flashes? It’s not their age. It’s what the, state of their body, when they get there that it can’t comfortably go through menopause, which is just a transition period in life. So, with thyroid, right, so I go, okay, what else goes, what else plays into it? Do they have an adrenal problem? If they’ve been stressed out are their thyroid receptors being zonked by, you know, excess cortisol or not enough cortisol? Is their conversion from T4 to T3 being impaired because they have too much stress, right? 

Too much cortisol, not enough cortisol. Are there some nutritional deficiencies? Like the soils are depleted in a lot of minerals plus people, especially by the time they get to be, you know, a little older, you know, out of their twenties and thirties, but even then they have problems. They have problems with their stomach acid, low stomach acid, not producing enough stomach acid, taking antacids because they just ate horrific meal that caused them to have pain. Doctor gave them, or over the counter, you take an antacid interfering with their protein absorption. What can protein absorption interference cause? Well, I mean, amino acids, brain chemistry, right. What can the B vitamins, or the minerals, right. The mineral, called the cofactors. So, we always want to go backwards. You know, is their blood sugar a mess. 

Is their blood sugar up and down and all over the place. And their receptors are messed up. Thyroid and insulin imbalance go hand in hand so much. And we can’t just address one. You have to address both. So, it’s looking at the roots and what’s their diet like? What’s their stress level like? We go there right from the beginning for everybody because sympathetic overdrive is an underlying cause of just about anything going on there. So, we have to address that. What are they eating? How are they eating? Are they eating on the run, good food, but on the run and not getting, you know, a slowdown and having cortisol levels go up when they’re eating and messing with their digestion. So, it’s understanding the interplay between all these systems that we can help this person. I have so many people who have come to us either as through the clinic, as patients or as practitioners to have their light bulb go on, and go, oh my God, that’s why. We’ve had so many people that finally get help when you actually look for the root cause. And so many physicians say, wow, why didn’t they teach that in medical school? 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

I love, I love this because it does, you smile, and I smile because we know how happy people are when they go, well, how come no one else told me this? You know how come like my doctor didn’t go there and that kind of a thing. Now I want to ask you because you mentioned something that I think is totally critical. And it’s not just like, you know, a lot. So, people might right now listening to this, they might be intimidated. Oh, I have to know all this stuff, all this stuff. It’s more of like, well, what are your skills? And how do you think, talk about that. Because it’s the skills and the way you think that really matter, because no one can know everything, but you can help a lot of people with the right point of view and the right skills. So, what kind of skills, point of view are you talking about? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

And knowing how to reference, knowing how to find the information super important. So, it’s asking the right questions. I always say, everything starts with why? What is the, what are the five questions you need to be asking to get a good answer? Why? Why? Why? Why? Why? And we want to keep asking why, right. Hot flashes. Why do they have hot flashes? Oh, their estrogen and progesterone is out of balance. Why is their estrogen and progesterone out of balance? Oh, look, their cortisol is way low or the cortisol has been high for a long time and they’ve been draining the swamp basically. And all the, everything goes towards cortisol. Why is that happening? Well, ah, they have a digestive imbalance as well. So, there’s some physical stress on the body, which is raising the cortisol. And, oh, they’re not sleeping properly. And so, we just keep asking why, why, why, until we get, we get to the basement level. 

And then we go, okay, now we have to address these things along the way. So, just keep asking why. And you know, you learn that when you were three, right. You didn’t learn it when you were three. You just naturally knew to ask it. Why mommy? Why mommy? Why mommy? Why mommy, until you finally got, oh, that’s why mommy, thank you. You know, that’s what we want to do with our clients. Right. So, you have to know that you have to have the basic understanding of how the body works and all the interactions. I think that’s super important to know that we can’t just go to, you know, take a weekend workshop on health coaching and learn how to, you know, put together a six month program. And I don’t know, teach people how to eat differently. That’s just not, that’s going to get them started of course. 

But if we really, really want to deal with those complex people who have been from practitioner to practitioner, you’ve got to understand how it works, you know, understanding the biochemistry and you’re never going to learn it all. You’re never going to know it all, because I’m sitting there with my books and pulling it out and go, oh, that’s how that pathway works. Or I’m not going to remember every step in the pathway that I have in my head. Oh, let’s look at the Krebs cycle because there’s different stages in there that require niacin and other stages that require, I don’t remember exactly, sertraline goes to… I don’t remember what cofactors. I pull my book out and I look at the pathway and go, oh, no wonder their oat test shows that they have high in this, they probably are low in B6 or B3 or whatever. But when you learn that, how to think that way, how to think in kind of systems, right. It makes sense. It helps you to be able to figure things out. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

It makes a ton of sense. I’m glad you reminded me, of the, and you could put it like this, you know. You have to know the five questions that every kid knows to ask. Why? Why? Why? And Why? I mean, kids do that, right. The only difference is the answer is not the same. Cause when it’s kids, you say, cause I said so, that’s why. And that’s all you need to know right now. Now if.. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

My kids wouldn’t take that for an answer. And I would actually give them answers and I, my mother-in-law would listen to me and go he’s three years old. Why are you telling him about macrophages? Because he asked me a question and I did, and the kid got it and said to his dad, when his dad was sniffling, “Hey dad, you need more macrophages.” They get it. Like you can talk to people at that level. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yeah, as if it was a breakfast cereal. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Well, dad didn’t know it wasn’t a supplement. He came to me and said do you have a bottle of macrophages anywhere? I’m like… 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

That’s funny. So, it’s important to understand the chemistry of the body. You just talked about that a little bit, you know, the biochemistry and things and I don’t think you can get by without it, you have to kind of know how things work or know where to go find out how they work. Cause it can lead you, because you’re going upstream. Well, how do you go upstream? You look at how things work and that includes anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, right. 

© 2020 Reed Davis All Rights Reserved Page 10 of 17

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

And then pathophysiology, like how does it go wrong? What are all the ways it can go wrong? Yeah. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

It’s remarkable. And so, now what about what’s become really popular lately and I went to, I went to a workshop years ago on it, that I didn’t think it was very good. Because it hadn’t become prime time, but today it’s pretty prime time, genetics, you know. So, we’ve got to know a little bit about someone’s genetics, right. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Yeah. And you can guess at their genetics, if you know how it works, but actually if you get some genetic reports and I don’t mean going to 23Andme and looking at that thing and going, I have a 2.2% increased risk of Alzheimer’s. What does that mean? Right. So, we look at genetics specifically as to how it relates to what nutrients this person might, might actually need more of than the average person. Why do you 

keep giving this person B6 or taking B6 and it’s not working? Well, you look, you can look to the genetics. Why are some people extremely sensitive to petrochemicals, extremely sensitive to like exhaust fumes when they’re pumping gas in their car and why are others okay? There’s some genetic factors. And what I find with the genetic factors, for me, it helps me to design a program. 

But most of the time it confirms what I already know by doing a history. After being doing this for almost 30 years, I kind of can get that. But when you look at the genes and say, oh, you better not be pumping your own gas or you better let the attendant or you better make sure the car’s turned off when you’re pumping the gas because the exhaust fumes, or you better make sure your car is, you know, out in the driveway, if it’s an attached garage. Or that you don’t close the door to the drive, the garage for 20 minutes so it can exhaust out. Cause it’s coming in your house. Like that helps people to see these little subtle changes that they can make. And when they see it and I show them in their genetics, they’ll go, oh, oh, maybe I really do need to get rid of gluten, those genes over there, maybe I really do need to not eat those McDonald’s hamburgers anymore because of the chemicals that my body can’t break down. And it’s such a great tool. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Although I don’t think it can tell you if you can break, they tell you the propensity, right? Like you’ve got the gene, but you don’t know if it’s going to express in it. You know, you don’t want them turning on. So, what you’re really coaching people up on is, hey, look, you’ve got this gene, like me. I have the gene for colon cancer. Oddly enough, my Dad died of it and so did his Dad. So, you know, hey, that’s, that’s a time bomb or like, you know, a bullet in the gun, you know. But I, what I do and have done for years since I first ran that test, and I probably didn’t need to, I probably should have just looked at my Dad and my granddad, but you know, I’m not that smart. So, I had to run a test. And it told me that I had those genes. Like, oh, darn. And then, then you read, what can you do? I ate zero cold cuts, and processed meats, and nitrites, and nitrates, and the things that could trigger that. So, I just wanted to clarify that for the listeners. It’s not quite as clear as just, you know, but so again, it shows you those genetic potentials and some of them can be time bombs, you know. Yeah. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Some of them can be time bombs. And here’s the thing though, Reed, what you just said, genetic propensity to a particular disease that just depends on, you can turn that on easily, right. You sit down and eat your salami sandwiches every day and don’t take probiotic foods and boom, you’re going to have a problem. But like with something else, the way you turn on or off the gene is exposure. So, if you’ve got a genetic tendency or an liver will CYP1A2 or something or 1A3 or whatever those genes might be, and they actually will control your body’s ability to handle a toxin. The way that, that is activated is exposure to the toxin. So, if you change your diet, lifestyle, exposures so that you’re not exposed to a toxin, that you have the genetic tendency to not break down well, then you’re not going to have the problems related to it. Right. So, it’s a little different than a disease propensity. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yeah. I always find it really funny when people look at their gene tests and they go, oh, look, I’ve got the potential for bigger brain or, you know, like they get real happy about these ones, and they think, oh, those I’m going to be, they automatically assume like, that they have all the, no that’s just potential to, you know. That doesn’t mean that you’re smarter than everyone else. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Exactly. And it means that you have to feed it. Right. And the way I always explain it, so people won’t go, oh, I have this gene I’m going to get colon cancer. Okay. Every cell in your body has the genetics to create every other cell in your body. So, your hand has the genetics of creating eyeballs. Why don’t we all walk around with an eye, I would love to have eyeballs on my hands. Quite frankly that would be nice. Right. Oh, look, there’s something there. Right. But that’s not true, but it’s turned off. And it’s turned off by the epigenetics and the epitomes and all this other complicated science, which I only partially understand at this point, and life only partially understands. But what keeps that turned off is that there’s, there’s this tendency, methylation factors, and all this, but if there’s, if you’re exposed to some nuclear radiation, why do you think, you know, we see like fish developing weird things. And they develop sex organs from the opposite sex of what they are, or five toes or whatever. That’s a DNA mutation that could potentially cause us to have eyeballs on our hands. So, we have to just look at it that way. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yes. The mutation. And the other thing about genes that I, I think it’s worthy to mention to our audience here is that, there’s this thing called the nocebo effect. You know, where, because you told somebody, you got the gene for colon cancer, next thing, you know, they’re going to get checked out for it. And they’re like, wow, I’m going to get colon cancer and they get all sort of, you know, we all know what the placebo effect is. You give someone a sugar pill and say this is for your headaches and their headaches go away or some weird thing. But the nocebo effect, it’s why it’s kind of a two edged sword, but forearm is, forewarned is forearmed or something like that. And I’m glad I took the test and found out what my potential for bad things is. The other one was about coffee, you know, like, cause you can get your genes tested to see if you’re a good coffee detoxer, processor. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Absolutely, CYP1A2. I know it well. And here’s the thing about that gene. That’s 75% of it. There’s others that detoxify caffeine, but the CYP1A2 and 75% of all the caffeine that goes into your body is detoxified by that particular. And you can be an over active caffeine metabolizer or an under, and it’s when you’re 

an underactive one that you have to be really super careful about taking the caffeine in. But here’s the thing that I always tell people about that, that gene also detoxifies estrogen. And there’s a bunch of metabolites, as you know, from reading Dutch texts. Right. The O4’s, O2’s and 16’s. Well, that particular gene is particularly important for detoxifying the 4’s, which is the most potent estrogen, 4-hydroxyestrone the most potent estrogen, which is most associated with breast cancer and other kinds of estrogen sensitive cancers. But here’s what I tell them. 

You are, you have a decrease, you have an under activity, you have the tendency to have an under activity of that. Every time you drink a cup of coffee, think about your breasts because you’re taking away the livers ability to detoxify that estrogen. And that estrogen you’re exposed to that all the time, because it’s just part of the body we’re producing it and detoxifying it. So, those people really, I just believe, need to get off of coffee. Me, I don’t drink coffee. So, I went in there to see what mine is, and I’m fine with it. So, I just let myself eat chocolate, which I like, which is full of caffeine. You know, I don’t like coffee, but I’m okay with it. My body handles it well. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yeah. Remarkable. It’s remarkable how unique and individual we are, you know, which is going back to some of that lab testing, the idea of treating the paper, not the person, you know. It’s unfortunate that you got to go to a, you know, a health coach alternative for this way of thinking that we, that we do, you know. It should be mainstream and that’s partly what we’re trying to accomplish here. Yeah. Trying to make it, look, there’s always going to be a need for physicians who are trained in disease processes. Because things can turn South fast on you. And I always refer, I refer, do a lot of referrals. Like people come to me and I say, well, I’m a health coach consultant, you know, a counselor, educator. I’m not a physician. So, you need to check with your doctor, make sure that the downward spiral isn’t so contracted that observations I make, can’t be capitalized on it. Cause, hey, you’re dying. You know, if you get off a plane from West Africa with a temperature of 105, don’t call your health coach, go to the emergency room, you know, and… 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Go to the ER, but then call your health coach to help you to build back your immune system. But you need the antibiotics at that point. There’s definite need for drugs to save lives. It’s just, doesn’t need to be, it’s like, we don’t need it for a hang nail. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yeah. Stop the bleeding. And then, you know, do all the repair and rebuilding, restore, and prevention, and anti-aging and all that sort of stuff. Well, I just have maybe a little bit more, it’s been so entertaining. The time’s gone by so quickly, but I want you to talk a bit about your course, you know, you’re a great teacher, you’re so devoted and dedicated and you have so much fun doing this, which is the way it should be. You’re a great leader in the field. Tell us a bit about that. You know, is it for doctors only? Is it for nutritionists, health? You know, who can take it? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

No. It’s for everybody. Well it’s not for everybody, everybody, but it’s a program. It’s called Nutritional Endocrinology Practitioner Training. It’s actually six levels of training in there and each of them has a set of modules that go together and you get to, they take tests at the end of each one. So, you can apply for certification if that’s what you choose. It’s basically, it’s for health coaches, doctors, nurses. We have every kind of health professional in there. And also people I don’t limit it, just having had a license already. There are a lot of people who have been their own personal health coach for decades. They’re going on to every summit. They’re reading every book, they’re learning about how their body works. And some of those make better practitioners, quite frankly, than people who have already been practitioners, but we get them in there. 

But we do have a screening process and we do make sure that we, the person that’s applying, isn’t like, oh, I’m just leaving my job as a truck driver and somebody told me nutrition was an important thing. And let me come to your program. That’s not going to work that way. Right. So, it’s for people who already have some, some understanding and some knowledge, whether it’s self-taught or whether it’s through one of the health coaching programs, or a certified practitioner, licensed practitioner. And we just take them through a process, right. And it’s a building process. You have to go through the groundwork of how to think, and we do that right at the beginning? How is energy produced? What does the mitochondria do? Because everybody has low energy and we’re right away going, oh, you have a thyroid problem, do this. 

Or you have a whatever problem do that. We’re really teaching you the basics of how is energy produced. And these are all in the, in the beginning and then how, what kind of foods, what kind of lifestyle? So, there’s a basic building process and that’s level one. And then you learn about insulin resistance and then you move on and we have a functional nutrition level, which is all the macronutrients, all the micronutrients in minute detail. How does vitamin C actually work in the body? Where is it absorbed? What interferes with it? What conditions do you need it for? We do that for 27 nutrients or 30 nutrients in the body. So, it’s a hefty module. And then what about all these, I call them food religions. Maybe it’s sacrilegious to call it that, but the dogma of this diets right for you, this diets right for you. No, you need to do paleo. No, you need to go oxalate. No, you need to do the, the lectin, low lectin diet. What’s right for that person? How do you determine what diet program or what blend of practices that person gets? So, the functional nutrition, but they have to have the basics before they go into the functional nutrition one. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yeah. I know it’s really extensive. And like I said, if I wasn’t teaching my course I’d be taking yours again. Now again… thank you. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Sorry than we have the functional assessments one, and then, you know, the biochemistry and the anatomy physiology, all of that’s blended into the different levels. So, I don’t want to bore you with the whole thing. I could spend an hour talking about. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Tell us about, tell us about the book over your left shoulder there. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Unstoppable Health. It’s a book I wrote. It’s actually a novel. It’s just my, it’s not my premier book someday, I’m going to actually write it. But this is a book that I wrote to take people through a process, a story of a woman, you know, right around the age of 40 starting to get into the menopausal age and all her trials and tribulations of actually figuring out and finding the lifestyle factors, the foods, the nutrients that she needed, but it’s written in the story. So, people don’t put it down after chapter one, they want to read chapter two, right. Because how many books do you have on yourself honestly, that you’ve just like read skimmed through the first chapter and then said, oh, this is a good book. I’m going to read it someday. And I wanted them to read it all the way through. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Yeah. That’s fantastic. Well, thanks for sharing that. Finally I want to say to the audience that, we’re going to put all your show notes, in things about you so they can reach out directly to you, in the show notes. And they can go out there now, right after this is done and also buy the VIP access passes to get all the recordings. Cause you know, you’re not, you know you’re not going to watch them all this week, so you might as well just get them. And then you can, you know, you have nothing to do on weekends. You can listen to them all and listen to your favorite ones over again. Now, so, I wanted to say that. And then last question, what’s the top standard practices that all professionals should do? What, I’ve been trying to sort of elevate the group here and get the opinions of leaders like you on what is the thing that’s going to separate you from everyone else when it comes to being a professional versus just kind of a dabbler or hobbyist? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

This seems really basic, but you have to know how to ask the right questions in doing a history, because you can get 90% of what you need, maybe even more just by asking the right questions, that’s going to help you to determine, do they need labs? What labs do they need and what further investigations or studies are needed? But what happens in our current system is that, oh, you’ve got 10 minutes with each patient. Nobody gets to do the way it was taught traditionally to do a really thorough history. And you figure stuff out. I mean, I can figure stuff out. 

Usually if I can speak to somebody for an hour and ask the right questions, I can get to the root and then we can confirm or deny whatever it might be by doing testing and looking at other things. But I think we just need to ask a full history. I have so many people come to me and say, as practitioners, oh, I have a new patient and they have hot flashes. What herbs should I use? Like, I don’t know. You got to go, why are they having hot flashes? And you have to ask all those questions. What are they eating? You know, what kind of food allergies might they have? What kind of food sensitivities, what kind of nutrient imbalances, what kind of stressful things are going on? What exposures do they have right before this started? Right. Real thorough history is so, so important. And it’s underrated right now. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

It’s totally underrated. And what people want to do instead is just use questionnaires. Now I have questionnaires and questionnaires are great. You can get a lot of information from a questionnaire because you’ve got a record, you’re establishing a record. But the idea of interviewing, asking questions and never forgetting to ask why, but why? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Why? Why? Exactly. And when, and when, and when, like when did this first start, what was happening right before this started? So many times people will come up with, oh my God, this whole thing started after my mom and dad got divorced and my mom went out and I had to, I mean, little things like that. And then we go back to, okay, what was this imbalance that was created? What happened? And it’s so important. And that’s part of our level one training is that you’ve got to learn the basics. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Cause that’s part of that. How do you think? You know, and I started in 1998, but in 2001 I read an article about stress and how 70 to 80% of all doctor’s visits are for stress, stress related, chronic stress related things. And then about 50% of most diseases, your chronic stress, your downward spiraling type diseases are caused by stress. So, you’ve hit a big home run with me and you always do Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN, thank you so much for being here. We’re going to do this again. Is there anything else that we could be doing as leaders to, you know, to establish what we’re trying to establish here and become the primary form of…? 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN

Yes. And it’s just speaking out, don’t hold back. Whatever you are, wherever you are on this process, obviously Reed and I have been doing this for a really long time and you may be just starting out and going, oh, there’s no way. Don’t hold back. Every single person you meet at the supermarket that asks you about the kale in your shopping cart, asks you questions. Every single person, you can help people that are, you are two or three steps ahead of, and there’s tons of people you’re two or three steps ahead of. The more you learn, the more you take part in these educational programs, the further up you get, and the more advanced cases that you can help. So, don’t hold back is my biggest thing. 

 

Reed Davis, HHP, FDN-P, CMTA, CNT

Well, you can’t top that, and it’s a great way to sign off. Thank you so much again, doc. 

 

Ritamarie Loscalzo, MS, DC, CCN, DACBN  

Thank you, Reed.

 

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